Do you contribute unconditional love in the life of others?

We spend a lot of time in trying to be correct and perfect and win the attention and approval of others. In our own egoistic ways, we expect the same perfection from others, especially those who are important to our peace and happiness. As parents, we expect a lot of perfection from our children. We want them to become responsible adults and bring a good name to themselves and to their family.

We follow a similar pattern of our behavior in other relationships also making them or breaking them, depending upon how people stand up to our expectations or live according to the standards we deem important. We categorize and stereotype them according to our beliefs, desires, attachment and judgment.

If people fit into our expectations, we love them and like them. Otherwise, we criticize them or keep them away. There is certain selfishness in this approach, which we chose to ignore because it does not make us feel good.

Most of the conflicts in our relationships arise because of our desires and expectations. When both people in a relationship are selfish and self-centered, they do not remain in that relationship for long. Eventually, they develop differences and separate.

We are potentially capable of unconditional love, but it does not surface in us easily until we subject ourselves to intense spiritual transformations. In our eagerness to be something, have something and find security, we build walls around ourselves and become prisoners of our own actions, losing sight of our innate ability to radiate the light of God and His unconditional love. We cease to see the divinity in ourselves as well as in others. Need spiritual information and guidance? Visit medium.nu or rebeccaspardig.com

Post Author: Terry J. Key

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